Devils in Disguise

anthony-hopkins-20070226-217947

Devils in Disguise, in no particular order, and in the context of Modern non-trivial Software Craft:

  • Data Binding of UI Controls and Model
  • Statics, which is another name for Globals
  • Dependency Injection until you use a 3rd-party library you can trust to take care of it (just because that allows you to throw your hands in the air, point to their QA process and say you trust it until proven too faulty for your usage)
  • Thread-Safe Singletons
  • Extension Methods in .NET, as they MUST be static
  • Inheritance, at least in single-inheritance languages (and no: .NET Interfaces don’t count as multiple inheritance, sorry)
  • Web Browser Sessions
  • Equality of Generic Data Types (in Strongly-typed languages, but not much better in weakly-typed languages)
  • Public data members
  • Drag-n-Drop Designers</emstrong
  • Generic ‘Bags’ of data
  • “One-liners”

I’m sure I’m forgetting some…
Regardless, if you encounter 3+ during a single working session, you should definitely Stop and Reconsider.

Innovate 101

“If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses.” — H. Ford

Yes, there are question as to whether Henry Ford actually ever uttered those words or not. That’s not my area of expertise, so I won’t argue either side. I’m more interested in the idea of not listening to the (actual or potential) customers. Also, it’s worth reading this post by P. Vlaskovits on the topic, to see how you should understand your customers.

WebDev Tools


The most interesting tools for web-related projects, from WebDesignerDepot massive list:

Daily Scrums In The Wild

Well, one could argue that the two companies were these were recorded are not the best representation of “The Wild”. But nonetheless, it’s interesting to see SCRUM in practice. So, without further ado, here’s the videos for you:

Read More…

10 Things About Development For ‘The Others’

TL;DR (Shame on you! the full article has more than the list below!)

A list of 10 things that developers wish were better understood by entrepreneurs, by David Pierce for Startup Weekend:

  1. Know how developers work
  2. We like specifics
  3. Good code takes time
  4. “Just code it right the first time” rarely exists
  5. Lines of code per hour is not a real metric of success
  6. Productivity doesn’t always happen between 9 and 5
  7. Have some basic technical literacy
  8. Understand technical debt
  9. Understand the business value of refactoring and documentation
  10. Trust Your Developers

hmmmmmm….
While I clearly am impressed by this list, I think there’s a few things to be said about it.
Read More…

That Email from David Marcus? It’s Brilliant and Inspiring

Right. This made the rounds some time ago, so forgive me if you already heard about it, but it’s been sitting in my TODO list for a while and has now bubbled to the top, so…

First, The Screenshot (because in the Internet Age if you don’t have one of these, it didn’t happen).

Read More…